An Ottawa Cooking Class + Brioche Doughnuts

The space, and sous-chef Isaac

The space, and sous-chef Isaac

If you’re in Ottawa, The Urban Element holds very nice, high-quality cooking classes set in a beautiful converted fire station. There’s pretty much nothing I love more than a cooking class (which you will have noticed here, here and here). I love the spaces, the expert cooking equipment, the chefs, the like-minded nerds. True to form, this bread-baking class was a lovely mix of bearded stay-at-home dads, public servants, and the woman who casually mentioned that she hand made eight dozen croissants over Christmas.

IMG_2449

This class was five hours long, so we made a lot: iced lemon loaf, herbed biscuits, gingerbread waffles, challah, raisin bread, grissini (aka breadsticks), lavash, and these dougnuts. It took three whole hours before I could think about carbs again. I was almost sure that my leftover doughnut dough was going to waste away in my freezer, like deep frying was “hard,” but need I remind you that it is January and outdoor temperatures have been hovering around -20. The dough is a little precious, yes, but it mostly just involves waiting and using your stand mixer. And yes, a stand mixer is probably going to be necessary, for reasons you shall see in a second…

The end. Host Daniella and the best swag

The end. Host Daniella and the best swag

Brioche Doughnuts (adapted from Anna March at The Urban Element)

The measurements look a bit loopy because they had been converted back from grams. Just know that if you have to choose between dough that is slightly too dry or slightly too wet, choose to keep it on the wetter side.  Oh, and one of the most interesting discoveries from this class was that flour can be quite different even between Canada and the U.S., especially with pastry flour. So you needn’t bother with any special bread flour here, all-purpose is fine.

It's like a ray of light. And yes, that is an article about Justin Bieber.

It’s like a ray of light. And yes, that is an article about Justin Bieber.

  • 3 1/2 cups + 3 tbsp flour
  • 1 tbsp instant yeast (quick-rise)
  • 1/4 cup + 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 3/4 cup + 1 1/2 tbsp milk, warmed to 75°F
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract, or 1 vanilla pod, scraped
  • 2 ounces soft butter, cut into small cubes
  • canola oil, for frying
  • cinnamon sugar/powdered sugar for tossing your doughnuts
  1. Place the flour and yeast in the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with a dough hook. Mix for about 15 seconds to distribute the yeast. Add all remaining ingredients except for the butter and mix for about four minutes.
  2. Increase the speed a bit and slowly start adding the cubes of butter one piece of a time, waiting until one piece is incorporated into the dough before adding another. Mix for another 15-20 minutes (see?) until the dough is smooth and soft.
  3. Scrape the dough onto a very lightly floured surface, shape it into a rectangle and fold it in like a letter.
  4. Grease a glass or plastic bowl and put your dough into it, seam side down. Spread with a bit more oil, cover with plastic wrap and let it rise for an hour at cool room temperature (ideally 20-22°C).
  5. Using a spatula, release the dough from the bowl and again pat it into a rectangle and fold it like an envelope.
  6. Now you want to proof the dough by putting it back into the bowl, covering it and letting it rest in the fridge overnight.
  7. The next day take it out and roll the dough out into an 11-inch round, which should be a couple centimetres thick.
  8. If it’s hard to work with, put it in the freezer for 10 minutes. I had no problems, though, so I just went on to slicing. With a round cutter, stamp out as many doughnuts as you can. If you’re going to fill them after (with jam, custard, lemon curd, you name it), leave as is. If you want your doughnuts to have little holes, then you can find a smaller cutter or do as I did and just use a sharp knife.
Proofing

Proofing

The final stages:

  1. Put your formed doughnuts onto baking trays greased with canola oil and set aside to proof for 60-90 minutes. They should be roughly doubled in size. Now, you can cheat with the first proof, but not this. They will puff up quite a bit in the oil, but you do want to make sure they’re looking risen and fluffy at this stage.
  2. Now heat your oil to around 300°C. Conventional wisdom is to go to around 350-375, but that was making my doughnuts burn, so 300 seemed to work better. Keep in mind that frying in oil on the stove is never going to be as fool-proof as with a deep-fryer; on the stove the temperature regulation just isn’t there.
  3. Keep a wire cooling rack and your powdered sugar nearby and start frying! You’re looking at about 30 seconds each side, depending on how big your doughnuts are. When they’re browned, take them out and put onto your cooling rack. You want to roll the doughnuts in the sugar while they’re still hot. As you may have gathered, these are best eaten soon after frying.
Nom.

Nom.

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One Comment on “An Ottawa Cooking Class + Brioche Doughnuts”

  1. Stanislava says:

    Looks like hard work for an average human. Mouth-watering results!


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